Healthy Moroccan Spiced Carrot Hummus

A few years ago I came across this AMAZING recipe for Morrocan Spiced Carrot Hummus on The Kitchn. The Kitchn is one of my go to websites for healthy recipe inspiration. This healthy Moroccan spiced carrot hummus recipe is a crowd pleaser with it’s interesting mix of flavors, bright color, and healthy ingredients. This recipe is so good that I haven’t really explored making changes to it. I do typically use fresh ginger (the original recipe uses ground ginger) and I peel the skins off of the chickpeas, which is time consuming, but also kind of therapeutic and it makes the hummus creamier and easier to digest. I also tend to add a little extra of all of the spices. I’ve been a bit obsessed with Moroccan spices lately. 🙂 They’re just so good!

healthy-carrot-hummus-recipe

Moroccan-Spiced Carrot Hummus

Makes a ton! (And will last about a week in a sealed container in the fridge)

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound carrots, chopped into 1-inch chunks
  • 3-4 whole cloves of garlic, peels left on
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained if from a can. Note: I like to peel the outer skin off to make a creamier hummus
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup water + more to thin if necessary
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • thumbnail piece of fresh ginger peeled and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • Fresh cilantro or parsley to garnish

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. On a lined baking sheet toss the chopped carrots and whole garlic cloves with half of the olive oil. Roast the carrots in the oven until tender and lightly browned. After about 10 minutes of roasting stir the carrots and garlic and then place back in the oven for another ten minutes.
  3. Remove carrots and garlic from the oven and allow to cool. Once cooled enough to handle peel the skins off of the garlic.
  4. In your food processor combine carrots, garlic, chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, water and all of the spices. Begin to process your hummus and with the motor running slowly add the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Process until smooth. You may want to scrape down the sides at some point. If the hummus is too thick and you still have large chunks of carrot add a little more water or oil and process until the right consistency.
  5. Garnish with a cilantro or parsley sprig or two and serve with fresh veggies or crackers.
  6. Impress your friends with this tasty snack!

moroccan-spiced-carrot-hummus-recipe

How to Prepare for a Yoga Retreat

A common question from retreat attendees is “how do I prepare for a yoga retreat?” For most of us, we don’t practice yoga 2+ hours each day, let alone 5, 6, or 7 days in a row so I think there is a bit of fear and apprehension that comes into play during the lead up to a yoga retreat. Don’t sweat it. You’ll be fine whether you practice once a week or everyday…. an experience yogi or a newbie. The following are my tips for how to prepare for a yoga retreat, whether it’s your first retreat or your hundredth!

1. Prepare for a yoga retreat by keeping your yoga practice up.

Make sure to keep your practice up and add a class or two if you have time. But most importantly keep your yoga practice balanced. If you always practice vinyasa add a yin or restorative class or vice versa. Your body will thank you when it feels strong, open, vibrant, and relaxed on retreat.

Two weeks before your retreat is not the time to start practicing headstands/handstands/advanced postures if you’ve never done them before. Trust me you don’t want to injure yourself right before your retreat. Just wait. If those postures are on the agenda at your yoga retreat you will have plenty of time to explore them in a mindful manner.

yoga surf retreat nicaragua

Warrior 3

2. Trust the process and your teacher.

Booking a yoga retreat is a pretty courageous act, especially if it’s your first retreat or with a yoga teacher you don’t practice with regularly. Assuming you’ve done a bit of research to get to know the teacher a bit better, have chatted with them on the phone or via email and connected on social media it’s time to relax. An experienced retreat leader will make sure you receive all of the necessary information before you need it.  Let go of the need to micromanage your life for just this little bit… you’re going on retreat aren’t you? Let your retreat leader guide you on your journey.

3. Be willing to put in 110%.

I’m not just talking physically here. Be willing to open up, to let go of old habits and preconceived self-limiting beliefs, to let down your walls and to connect with others. You already have a lot in common with the other people on the retreat, so be yourself and enjoy new friendships.

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Yoga babes.

4. You don’t need 20 pairs of yoga pants, your hair dryer or your makeup.

I’m completely guilty of overpacking yoga leggings and I’ve seen it many times from my students too. You don’t need as much as you think. Likely, you will end up wearing the same couple of outfits over and over simply because it’s easy. And there is no need to primp during a yoga retreat. We will happily accept you as you are. Sweaty, crazy haired, and glowing.

5. Prepare fora yoga retreat by ask yourself “What is my intention?”

Get clear about your intention or sankalpa for the retreat. What are your goals? Why are you attending a yoga retreat in the first place? Is it to deepen your yoga practice? To learn meditation? To relax and rejuvenate? To connect with yourself? To heal emotionally, physically, spiritually? Whatever your intention don’t be afraid to honor that. Sometimes honoring your sankalpa means skipping a yoga practice to sleep in or journal or walk the beach. Sometimes it means being bold and letting down all the barriers you’ve built up. Sometimes it means trying something completely new.

6. Eat mindfully, so you don’t “shock” your system.

raw-vegan-vegetarian-bali-yoga-retreat

Healthy eats! Raw vegan wraps. Yum!

Most yoga retreats have amazing, healthy meals with minimal processed food, meat, alcohol and caffeine. You can prepare for a yoga retreat by beginning to cut processed food and toxins out of your diet a week or two before the retreat. Ease your way into a new healthy radiant you.

7. Practice on your travel mat beforehand.

If you’re bringing a travel mat, or even a new mat, make sure to practice on it beforehand. A slick mat, or one that stretches in downward facing dog is annoying at best. Test it out beforehand and if it doesn’t work out pack your old standby. A “crappy” mat can make for a frustrating yoga retreat. You don’t want something as simple as a yoga mat to detract from your experience.

8. Learn about your destination.

Where are you going? What is that part of the world known for? Do you have time for extra excursions? Prepare for a yoga retreat by doing a little research beforehand. It will get you pumped up about where you’re going and it might even get your friends excited enough to tag along. Sweet!

luxury-yoga-retreat-france-dordogne

9. Set aside all expectations.

Manage your expectations. As you prepare for a yoga retreat make sure to ask your retreat leader questions about things you want clarity about…. transportation, food, excursions. Get the answers you need and want… and then let it go. The nature of retreats, especially international retreats, is that sometimes things need to change to bring the best experience to the students. Maybe the teacher has had to rearrange excursions due to whether or even swap them out completely… maybe instead of going on that jungle hike you’ll get a lovely massage instead. Don’t worry about it. The instructor wants you to love the experience as much as you want to love the experience, so roll with the punches, go with the flow, ride the wave. It will be amazing.

“To explore what it would mean to live fully, sensually alive and passionately on purpose, I have to drop my preconceived ideas of who and what I am.”

Dawna Markova

Happy Retreat Prep Yogis!!!

Love and Light,

Autumn

 

 

 

Jamu Recipe

turmeric-jamu-recipe

Jamu is a healing Balinese elixir made of turmeric, ginger, lime, tamarind and honey. I drank Jamu religiously during my yoga teacher training at Zuna Yoga, and will likely drink it religiously again this fall at my upcoming yoga retreat in Bali, Indonesia.

The flavor of Jamu, especially when it hasn’t been sweetened much, is an acquired taste for sure. Jamu packs an intense turmeric punch… made even punchier with fresh ginger added to the mix. On top of the basic ingredients you can add other spices for flavor or for Ayurvedic purposes. I like to add black pepper and cayenne to mine, and sometimes cloves. Jamu’s main ingredient, turmeric, is rich in curcumin, a fantastic anti-inflammatory. Combining turmeric with black pepper (which contains piperine) helps our body absorb the curcumin. Want to learn more about the amazing benefits of turmeric? Check out this article at AuthorityNutrition.com.

Just a few ounces of Jamu each day is enough and should be thought of as a natural medicine, so you don’t want to overdo it… although I’ve definitely guzzled it down on more than one occasion and survived.

Here is a simple Jamu recipe to follow:

Ingredients

  • 7-10 inches turmeric root, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch chunks
  • 3 inches fresh ginger, peeled
  • 3 T. tamarind paste
  • juice from 2 limes or 1 1/2 lemons
  • 1 T. honey or 1 cup of pineapple juice
  • 1 liter of water
  • Cayenne, to taste
  • Black Pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large pot on medium high heat add water and turmeric. Once the water begins to boil turn the heat down to a simmer and cover. Simmer for 18-20 minutes.
  2. Add the ginger and tamarind paste and simmer for another 4-5 minutes.
  3. Allow mixture to cool. Once mixture has cooled add the turmeric mixture and honey to your blender in batches (just a warning: if your blender is plastic it will be stained yellow afterward). Blend until smooth.
  4. Using a fine mesh strainer you will strain the ingredients over a bowl to separate the solids from the liquids. You may need to use a spatula to press some of the moisture out of the solids. Discard the solids.
  5. Add citrus juice, cayenne and black pepper to your mixture. Stir, taste and adjust… maybe add more sweetener if you feel like you need it… maybe dilute it with some extra water.
  6. Poor mixture into glass jars, seal them up and store in the fridge. Jamu will keep in the fridge for 3-5 days.

 

Super Fresh Farmer’s Market Salad

farmers-market-salad-recipe

I love this time of year for all of the wonderful produce we have available at the Farmer’s Market and this is one of my favorite salads. This is a recipe adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table Cookbook. I’ve made this recipe so many times I’m not sure how different it is from the original, but it is so delicious and easy. These days I need as simple as possible… otherwise I likely wouldn’t feed myself.

Farmer’s Market Salad (Serves 4)

Salad Ingredients

  • 2 ears of corn, husked
  • 2 bell peppers (your choice, but I like red and yellow best)
  • 2 large heirloom tomatoes, sliced into 1/3 inch slices
  • 1/3 cup garden fresh basil, chopped

Dressing Ingredients

  • 1 clove garlic, minced or pressed
  • juice from 1/2 lemon
  • 3 T. olive oil
  • 1.5 T balsamic vinegar
  • 1-1.5 t. honey
  •  2 t. stone ground mustard
  • salt and pepper to taste

Serve with sliced baguette.

Instructions

  1. Prepare your dressing. Combine all of the dressing ingredients in a medium size bowl and whisk until well blended. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  2. Turn grill onto high heat. Brush corn with a little olive oil and grill. Grill until each side is marked. Set aside. Once cool slice the corn from the cob and put in the bowl with the dressing.
  3. Grill peppers next using high heat until the skins are blistered. Brush with olive oil as necessary. Once cool remove the skins and seeds. Slice the peppers into 1/4 inch thick strips. Add the peppers to the dressing and stir gently.
  4. Allow the corn and peppers to sit in the dressing for 15-30 minutes. Add the basil just before serving.
  5. On a large plate or medium sized platter lay out your heirloom tomatoes and top with the corn and pepper mixture. Garnish with any extra basil leaves and dig in!
Autumn Adams
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Autumn Adams

Owner, Founder, & Retreat Leader at Ambuja Yoga
Autumn founded Ambuja Yoga in 2014 to share her love of adventure, yoga, and travel with her fellow yogis. Ambuja Yoga has morphed into more than she could have ever dreamed and she is thrilled to have a "job" she loves. She is forever grateful for the opportunity to facilitate personal growth and self love through yoga while taking yogis to off-the-beaten-path destinations worldwide. Follow Autumn on Instagram @autumnadamsyoga.
Autumn Adams
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Turmeric in everything, please!

As a young girl, my mother dated a man from Pakistan. With this relationship came a really awesome point in my life, food wise. This was when I discovered my absolute favorite thing to use in my kitchen; turmeric.

Processed with VSCO with f2 preset My mother made potatoes doused in it and the glass dish would be covered with neon yellow oil while they cooked. The intense color blew my little mind. Along with the taste.

So, 20 years later I am still using it in everything that I can think of. Sweet or savory, you can find it a place.

The health benefits of turmeric are widely regarded in Ayurveda and many remedies call for this nifty little gem of a root. Anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and it’s ability to heal those stomach issues that ail you, turmeric should become your new BFF.

Here are some delicious ways I utilize turmeric in my cooking:

Turmeric Hummus

My children will demolish an entire container of this in a day. It usually never even makes it into the fridge. This recipe is ridiculously easy and not to mention, SO YUMMY.

  • 2 cans of chickpeas; drained & rinsed.Processed with VSCO with f2 preset
  • 1 clove of garlic (or more if you like it intense)
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • Approximately 1/2 cup of tahini
  • Turmeric (the amount is up to you. I add maybe 1 1/2 tablespoons and will add more if I feel it needs it)
  • Sea salt (to taste. I would start with 1 tsp and adjust)
  • 1 cup avocado oil (add more to adjust thickness. avocado oil is my preferred choice since it’s mild, but olive oil is traditional)

*Throw ingredients into your blender and turn it in. It’s really that easy. Adjust your salt and oil and then dig in with fresh veggies or crackers. I also love a big dollop on top of a salad.

Carrot-Orange-Turmeric Juice

You’ll need a juicer for this, or else you can use a powerful blender such as a ninja or vitamix and then strain it.

  • Carrots (I buy a big bag of organic juicing carrots. I will usually use about half of a 5lb bag for this juice. And save the pulp! It goes great in muffins.)
  • Turmeric root (If you can’t obtain fresh turmeric, feel free to use powder in an amount that suits you. Fresh turmeric is intense so I usually use about a 1 1/2 inch piece)unnamed-4
  • Ginger Root (I like it ginger-y! Feel free to use as much as you like.)
  • Orange Juice (I buy organic fresh squeezed oj and use about 2 cups or more depending.)

*Juice all of your ingredients and either chill in the fridge for a few hours or serve over ice!

 

 

 

Golden Mylk

This is one of my favorite treats before bed time. On days when I make fresh almond or cashew mylk, this is most definitely a must.

  • Milk alternative (Avoid milk substitutes that contain the icky ingredient carrageenan gum. Califa Farms almond milk is a great choice and can be found in the refrigerated section of whole foods and the like. Otherwise, soak some almonds or cashews and make your own!)
  • Vanilla extract (Or vanilla bean)
  • Maple syrup
  • Turmeric
  • Black pepper
  • Cinnamon
  • Cardamon

*This “recipe” is really up to your own taste. I’ve simply listed what I use in my golden mylk and then I think it’s up to you to see what your preferences are for the spices. Heat up in a saucepan and then enjoy warm.

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There are so many delicious ways to use turmeric – curries, ice cream, golden mylk, hummus…the options are endless!

Kelsey Bushong

Kelsey Bushong

Kelsey is a stay at home mother to two young boys, Silas (3) and Felix (1.5). As someone who always loved to cook, Kelsey really dove into health and wellness during her first pregnancy. Going back to school after Felix was born, Kelsey altered her plan from Nursing to Nutrition and was accepted to the National College of Natural Medicine this past Spring to complete her Bachelors of Science in Nutrition. With her studies being heavily guided by ancient Ayurvedic practices, Kelsey is most interested in how food can be used as medicine and how diet and diseases relate. She hopes to spread the idea that clean eating and wellness are very much achievable for everyone and cooking clean and healthy does not have to be difficult!
Kelsey Bushong

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